Friday, May 29, 2015

AP Lit books for 2016-17

These are the books we will be reading 2015-2016.
You can buy your own for 1¢ + postage! *
That means you can write in them like a real college student!

*Some books will be more than 1¢. But they're still cheap.
And all of them are available for free from the OCHS library or in the classroom.
(However, you can't write in the books unless you own them.) (Duh.)

And by the way: Please do NOT use other editions of these titles.
The page numbers are always wrong.
Some of the words aren't even the same if they are in translation.
Don't use electronic versions for your papers, either--trying to cite quotations is a mess.
Either get the book from the OCHS library or buy this exact edition. Thanks!

Links below:

The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles
(SUMMER READING!!)

Death of a Salesman

Hamlet

A Doll's House

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The Kite Runner

Dante's Inferno

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Conflict!



Here is a helpful link about the different types of conflict, including examples.

When analyzing conflict, be sure to discuss which type(s) of conflict the protagonist is facing, as well as alternate possibilities (if there are strong alternate possibilities).

Academic language…

In writing about the conflict, it might sound something like this:

Our Hero struggles with man (person) versus ______________. We see evidence of this when…  The evidence demonstrates that Our Hero is fighting against ______________ because ____ (analysis).

Friday, May 30, 2014

Books, Books, Books!

These are the books we will be reading 2014-2015.
You can buy your own for 1¢ + postage! *
Whee! That means you can write in them like a real college student!

*Some books will be more than 1¢. But they're still cheap.
And all of them are available for free from the OCHS library or in the classroom.
(However, you can't write in the books unless you own them.) (Duh.)

And by the way: Do NOT try to use other editions of these titles.
The page numbers are always wrong.
Some of the words aren't even the same if they have been translated.
Don't use electronic versions for your papers, either--trying to cite quotations is a mess.
Either get the book from the OCHS library or buy this exact edition. Thanks!

Links below:

The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles
(SUMMER READING!!)

Hamlet

Death of a Salesman

The Metamorphosis & other stories
http://www.amazon.com/Metamorphosis-Other-Stories-Thrift-Editions/dp/0486290301/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1401479592&sr=1-1&keywords=DOVER+THrift+edition+metamorphosis

A Doll's House
http://www.amazon.com/Dolls-House-Dover-Thrift-Editions/dp/0486270629/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1401479647&sr=1-1&keywords=DOVER+THrift+edition+a+doll%27s+house

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The Kite Runner

Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Theater Set essay


Set Essay
AP Lit

In a 2-3 page essay, discuss the following elements of sets as used in dramatic productions.

1.     Discuss the role of the technical director (versus actors, director) in conveying a story to an audience.
2.     Describe the mechanical facilities of the theater.
3.     Describe the physical limitations under which a play operates (versus film).
4.     Discuss the “tools” available in set design: color, line, texture.
5.     Discuss the effects to which lighting and sound may be used.
6.     Discuss elaborate realistic versus minimalist unrealistic sets.
What different effects are conveyed through these different types of sets? Why do playwrights choose one type of set over another?
7.     If you are able to attend the play, reflect on your experience of the set (objects, light, and sound) as a member of the audience during the performance.

Of course…12 point font, double spaced. 

Due Tuesday, May 27

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"

Due as an in-class assessment - on Friday, May 16

Please read and respond to T.S. Eliot's poem, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," page 1186-1189 in the anthology.

This is a long and complex poem, and you will need to use your class time well.

You are welcome to use the resources at this website:


Name:
“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufock”
pp 1186-1189
Poetry Analysis

Please respond to TEN (total) of the following comprehension / analysis questions.
Answer at least 3 of the bolded questions.

1.     Read the translation of the quotation in Italian from Dante's Inferno that serves as our epigraph, and return to it once you have finished the whole poem. Why do you suppose T.S. Eliot wants to begin the poem this way? How is the damned soul speaking his secrets from the flames of hell in a similar situation to J. Alfred Prufrock?
RESPONSE:

2.     (L. 1) In the opening line, the speaker states, "Let us go then, you and I." Who is the you here? (Several possibilities here).
RESPONSE:

3.     (L. 3) The speaker (Prufrock) compares the sunset to a "patient etherised upon a table." Why do you suppose Prufrock would compare a sunset to some hospital patient who has been anesthetized and is waiting for an operation?
RESPONSE:

4.     (L. 13-14) In the second stanza, we have two lines that are disjointed from the earlier stanza. Here, Prufrock's mind appears to flash to a different location, where the "women come and go / Talking of Michelangelo." What can be inferred from th?
RESPONSE:

5.    (L. 15-23) In the third stanza, what is the yellow fog compared to in a simile? How is the fog like such a creature?
RESPONSE:

6.     (L. 26-27) What does Prufrock mean when he says, "There will be time, there will be time / To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet"? Have you ever had to "prepare a face" before you have met someone?
RESPONSE:

7.     (L. 38) After a fifth stanza that flashes back to the room of artsy women, the sixth stanza has Prufrock asking, "Do I dare?" and "Do I dare?" What is that Prufrock is daring himself to do? Why is he so frightened about that room full of brainy women discussing art?
RESPONSE:

8.     (L. 39) Prufrock reassures himself that there will be "Time to turn back and descend the stair." What does he mean by this, i.e., what can he do if he changes his mind? Why do you suppose T. S. Eliot chooses the verb descend rather than ascend? Does this connect with the Dante quotation about a guy trapped in hell in any way?
RESPONSE:

9.     (L. 40-44) What physical features cause Prufrock anxiety as he imagines going down the stairs? What does he imagine people will say about him?
RESPONSE:

10. (L. 45-46) What does Prufrock mean, "Do I dare / Disturb the universe?" How can one thin, balding, aging man disturb the entire universe?
RESPONSE:

11. (L. 57-58) Prufrock imagines people's eyes stabbing through his body and impaling him to the wall where he wriggles as people examine him--why would Prufrock use this imagery from bug-collecting? How is appropriate or inappropriate?
RESPONSE:

12. (L. 62-64) When Prufrock says he has "known the arms" already, how is this an example of synecdoche? What is he talking about? Why is so strangely excited to note that these bare, braceleted arms with white skin are lightly downed with faint hair?
RESPONSE:

13. (L. 66) Explain the anastrophe in "arms that wrap about a shawl." Think about it for a moment: what's weird about the phrasing?
RESPONSE:

14. (L. 73-74) Note the synecdoche in lines 73-74. Why doesn't Prufrock compare himself to a complete crab? Why is a crab particularly appropriate for Prufrock generally? (Ask a marine biologist about the way crabs travel and see how it matches the way Prufrock travels through life....)
RESPONSE:

15. (L. 81-82) Explain the biblical allusion to John the Baptist in lines 81-82. In what ways does this allusion add to the meaning of the poem?
RESPONSE:

16. In line 87, the verb tense switches to rhetorical pluperfect "would it have been worth it?" What does this shift in verb tense indicate? What changes in Prufrock's mind or in his plans between lines 86 to line 92?
RESPONSE:

17. (L. 94) Explain how Prufrock is connected to Lazarus in lines 94. How does this reference to coming back from the dead also connect with Dante and the initial epigram at the beginning of the poem?
RESPONSE:

18. (L. 111) What do we make of Prufrock's protest that he is not "Prince Hamlet"? Why is it ironic AND appropriate that Prufrock thinks of Hamlet as his epitome of a great hero?
RESPONSE:


19. (L. 130-131) Prufrock imagines himself under the water with the mermaids in "chambers of the sea." What happens at the end though when he hears the conversation of human voices around him that awakens him from his daydream?
RESPONSE:


Poetry - Imagery

Complete in class - Thursday, May 15
Due on Thursday, May 15

Read the following poems from the anthology. Answer the questions completely.
If you are doing the assignment from home, you should be able to find the poems online.

"Anthem for Doomed Youth" - p. 761
1. Structure – what type of poem is this?


2. What type of imagery predominates in the first 8 lines?
How does the imagery change in the last 6 lines?





3. Consider these images: “holy glimmers of good-byes, “pallor of girls’ brows,” patient minds,” “drawing-down of blinds.” What relationship do the people defined by these images have to the doomed youth?






"The Fish" - p. 763
Elizabeth Bishop

4. What impression does the fish make upon the speaker? Is the fish beautiful? Ugly? (Provide text evidence.) Why is the fish described in such detail?





5. What do the “five old pieces of fish-line” indicate?




6. How is the rainbow formed around the boat’s engine? Why does the speaker refer to the “pool of bilge”? What does the rainbow mean to the speaker?






 "I Know I'm Not Sufficiently Obscure" - p. 769
Ray Durem

7. Who is the “you” addressed by the speaker (lines 8, 15, 22)? Why does the speaker admit that he is not “sufficiently obscure”? What issue is he dealing with by this admission?

8. In line 3 the speaker says, “Imagery escapes me.” How does the rest of the poem contradict this statement?





9. Consider the images in lines 7, 8, 13, and 23-24. To what degree are these images timely? Dated?







 "Preludes" - p. 769
T.S. Eliot
This is a complex poem. You are examining the imagery. 

10. Prelude I: What is the setting? What details in the poem lead you to this conclusion?
(Include place and time setting.) What mood is evoked by these details in the setting? Why?







11. Prelude II: Often in literature, morning is associated with a new beginning. In what ways is the imagery in this Prelude ironic, given the setting of a new morning?






12. Prelude III. What is the point of view in this Prelude? How does the change in P.O.V. impact the meaning here?







13. Compare and contrast the last two unnumbered stanzas. Discuss the images in each. Discuss the meaning.